GAFA as international actors: technology, sovereignty, legitimacy

par Aisha Kadiri

Projet de thèse en Philosophie

Sous la direction de J. Peter Burgess.

Thèses en préparation à l'Université Paris sciences et lettres , dans le cadre de École doctorale École transdisciplinaire Lettres/Sciences , en partenariat avec La République des Savoirs : Lettres, Sciences, Philosophie (laboratoire) et de Ecole normale supérieure (établissement opérateur d'inscription) depuis le 01-09-2019 .


  • Résumé

    The global reach of the GAFA corporations (Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple) has become undeniable. They have quietly become international actors with more power to impact global affairs than most nation-states. By the same token, the leaders of the GAFA have increasing influence on the national stage, meeting world leaders and being increasingly scrutinised by members of the global public sphere. It goes nearly without saying that this new configuration of wealth, power, and digital technology puts into question the basic principles and premises of the Wilsonian international system, that is the self-determination of sovereign peoples, non-intervention, democracy, and liberal democracy. The purpose of this thesis is to map and analyse these changes using the tools of political philosophy, by studying the validity, coherence and conditions of applicability of classical concepts of political systems.

  • Titre traduit

    GAFA as international actors: technology, sovereignty, legitimacy


  • Résumé

    The global reach of the GAFA corporations (Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple) has become undeniable. They have quietly become international actors with more power to impact global affairs than most nation-states. By the same token, the leaders of the GAFA have increasing influence on the national stage, meeting world leaders and being increasingly scrutinised by members of the global public sphere. It goes nearly without saying that this new configuration of wealth, power, and digital technology puts into question the basic principles and premises of the Wilsonian international system, that is the self-determination of sovereign peoples, non-intervention, democracy, and liberal democracy. The purpose of this thesis is to map and analyse these changes using the tools of political philosophy, by studying the validity, coherence and conditions of applicability of classical concepts of political systems.