Subwavelength silicon photonic nanostructures for applications in the near-IR and mid-IR

par Thi thuy duong Dinh

Projet de thèse en Electronique et Optoélectronique, Nano- et Microtechnologies

Sous la direction de Carlos Alonso-ramos.

Thèses en préparation à université Paris-Saclay , dans le cadre de École doctorale Electrical, optical, bio : physics and engineering (Orsay, Essonne ; 2015-....) , en partenariat avec Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies (laboratoire) , Photonique (equipe de recherche) et de Université Paris-Sud (établissement de préparation de la thèse) depuis le 30-09-2018 .


  • Résumé

    Driven by the impressive development in the nanofabrication technologies and the nanoscale engineering, silicon photonics has rapidly become the platform of choice for on-chip integration of high performing photonic devices. At the beginning, these photonic circuits mainly targeted the realization of ultra-wideband transceivers for datacom applications, e.g. in big datacenters. However, this enormous technology development has opened new opportunities for Si photonics beyond datacom, with a growing interest in sensing, microwave photonics and quantum photonics applications. Aiming to meet the requirements of these envisioned applications, Si photonics is expanding its frontiers by exploring wider wavelength ranges and new physical phenomena. On the one hand, a great effort is being devoted to increase the operation wavelength from the near-infrared towards the mid-infrared, thus covering the full Si transparency window, between 1.1 um and 8 um wavelengths. This new wavelength range holds the promise to create exciting new opportunities, e.g. in absorption spectroscopy and nonlinear photonics. On the other hand, light-sound (photon-phonon) interactions in Si waveguides is raising a growing interest. Specifically, stimulated Brillouin scattering is being investigated, targeting key functionalities in all-optical circuits and microwave photonics signal processing. In this context of new applications, new wavelength ranges and new physical phenomena, researches in sub-wavelength engineering of Si structures can play a key role. Patterning Si with features smaller than half of the wavelength (well within the capabilities of standard large volume fabrication processes) has proven to be a simple and powerful tool to tailor material properties. This innovative approach releases new degrees of freedom that allow unprecedented flexibility in the design of light-matter interactions, chromatic dispersion and light propagation in general. Indeed, sub-wavelength engineering has already been used to demonstrate stat-of-the-art performance in several key devices, including low loss waveguides and crossings, micro-resonators, fiber-to-chip grating couplers and power splitters. The goal of this PhD is to develop new types of sub-wavelength nanostructured silicon photonics devices, targeting ultra-wideband operation and enhanced light-matter interactions.

  • Titre traduit

    Subwavelength silicon photonic nanostructures for applications in the near-IR and mid-IR


  • Résumé

    Driven by the impressive development in the nanofabrication technologies and the nanoscale engineering, silicon photonics has rapidly become the platform of choice for on-chip integration of high performing photonic devices. At the beginning, these photonic circuits mainly targeted the realization of ultra-wideband transceivers for datacom applications, e.g. in big datacenters. However, this enormous technology development has opened new opportunities for Si photonics beyond datacom, with a growing interest in sensing, microwave photonics and quantum photonics applications. Aiming to meet the requirements of these envisioned applications, Si photonics is expanding its frontiers by exploring wider wavelength ranges and new physical phenomena. On the one hand, a great effort is being devoted to increase the operation wavelength from the near-infrared towards the mid-infrared, thus covering the full Si transparency window, between 1.1 um and 8 um wavelengths. This new wavelength range holds the promise to create exciting new opportunities, e.g. in absorption spectroscopy and nonlinear photonics. On the other hand, light-sound (photon-phonon) interactions in Si waveguides is raising a growing interest. Specifically, stimulated Brillouin scattering is being investigated, targeting key functionalities in all-optical circuits and microwave photonics signal processing. In this context of new applications, new wavelength ranges and new physical phenomena, researches in sub-wavelength engineering of Si structures can play a key role. Patterning Si with features smaller than half of the wavelength (well within the capabilities of standard large volume fabrication processes) has proven to be a simple and powerful tool to tailor material properties. This innovative approach releases new degrees of freedom that allow unprecedented flexibility in the design of light-matter interactions, chromatic dispersion and light propagation in general. Indeed, sub-wavelength engineering has already been used to demonstrate stat-of-the-art performance in several key devices, including low loss waveguides and crossings, micro-resonators, fiber-to-chip grating couplers and power splitters. The goal of this PhD is to develop new types of sub-wavelength nanostructured silicon photonics devices, targeting ultra-wideband operation and enhanced light-matter interactions.