Synthesis and characterisation of ultre-small nanoparticules for in vivo imaging applications

par John Ddungu

Projet de thèse en Chimie

Sous la direction de Luisa De Cola.

Thèses en préparation à Strasbourg , dans le cadre de École doctorale Sciences chimiques (Strasbourg ; 1995-....) depuis le 22-01-2016 .


  • Résumé

    The project concerns the synthesis and characterisation of silicon, silica and cobalt nanoparticles for the imaging of lymph nodes to aid in targeted cancer surgery. The utilisation of nanomaterials in medicine holds a promising potential in emerging applications of diagnostic imaging as well as the prospect of new capabilities for delivering therapies tailored and targeted for specific diseases. However so far, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. The project I intend to undertake falls within the framework of the broader “NanoTracking” project of the Helmholtz Virtual Institute. The overall scientific goal of the institute is directed towards the development of novel functionalised nanomaterials for application in the imaging of cancer via appropriate techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging, with the aim being to design tailor-made nanomaterials and to provide a deeper understanding of their interactions in vitro and in vivo. The special expertise and infrastructure of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rosendorf in conjunction with four principal groups from Academia (KIT, University of Heidelberg (Germany), Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) and University College Dublin (Ireland) and four associated partners (TU Dresden/OncoRay, MPI of Colloids and Interfaces Potsdam, Bioquant Heidelberg, Monash University/Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences) will guarantee accomplishment of the comprehensive project objectives, as well as provide excellent cross-disciplinary training opportunities for the research teams of the participating institutions. The Virtual Institute is embedded in the cancer research environment of the National Centre for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden/Heidelberg, as well as European networks such as the FP-7 Research Infrastructure for NanoSafety assessment (QNano) coordinated by the University College Dublin principal group. It is anticipated that the combined know-how of the collaborators within the Virtual Institute will enhance, in a synergistic manner, the possibility to develop tailor-made nanomaterials for cancer diagnosis and treatment, and will serve as a nucleation point to start further national networks and international projects on the EU level.


  • Résumé

    The project concerns the synthesis and characterisation of silicon, silica and cobalt nanoparticles for the imaging of lymph nodes to aid in targeted cancer surgery. The utilisation of nanomaterials in medicine holds a promising potential in emerging applications of diagnostic imaging as well as the prospect of new capabilities for delivering therapies tailored and targeted for specific diseases. However so far, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. The project I intend to undertake falls within the framework of the broader “NanoTracking” project of the Helmholtz Virtual Institute. The overall scientific goal of the institute is directed towards the development of novel functionalised nanomaterials for application in the imaging of cancer via appropriate techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging, with the aim being to design tailor-made nanomaterials and to provide a deeper understanding of their interactions in vitro and in vivo. The special expertise and infrastructure of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rosendorf in conjunction with four principal groups from Academia (KIT, University of Heidelberg (Germany), Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) and University College Dublin (Ireland) and four associated partners (TU Dresden/OncoRay, MPI of Colloids and Interfaces Potsdam, Bioquant Heidelberg, Monash University/Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences) will guarantee accomplishment of the comprehensive project objectives, as well as provide excellent cross-disciplinary training opportunities for the research teams of the participating institutions. The Virtual Institute is embedded in the cancer research environment of the National Centre for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden/Heidelberg, as well as European networks such as the FP-7 Research Infrastructure for NanoSafety assessment (QNano) coordinated by the University College Dublin principal group. It is anticipated that the combined know-how of the collaborators within the Virtual Institute will enhance, in a synergistic manner, the possibility to develop tailor-made nanomaterials for cancer diagnosis and treatment, and will serve as a nucleation point to start further national networks and international projects on the EU level.